C. D. Broad, "A Reply to My Critics," in The Philosophy of C.D. Broad, edited by Paul Arthur Schilpp (New York: Tudor Publishing Company, 1959)

Introduction,
(I) Nature, Subdivisions, and Methods of Philosophy,
A. "CRITICAL" AND "SPECULATIVE PHILOSOPHY"
B. NATURE AND METHODS OF SPECULATIVE PHILOSOPHY
(II) Philosophy and Religion,
(III) Formation of Empirical Concepts
A. ABSTRACTION
B. DESCRIPTIVE IDEAS
(IV) Substance, Process, and Causation
A. SUBSTANCE
B. THING AND PROCESS
  1. The beginning-to-exist and ceasing-to-exist of a Thing
  2. "Absolute Process"
C. CAUSATION
  1. Epistemological Questions
  2. Analytical Questions
(V) Induction and Laws of Nature
A. LAWS OF NATURE
B. INDUCTION
  1. The so-called "Problem of Induction"
  2. Professor Nelson's account of Inductive Argument
  3. Assumptions about Antecedent Probability
  4. The notion of "Loading"
  5. Induction by Simple Enumeration and the Hypothetical Method
  6. The Theory of "Generators"
  7. Necessary Conditions and Sufficient Conditions
(VI) Time in general, and Precognition in particular,
A. TIME IN GENERAL
  1. Qualitative Change and "Absolute Becoming"
  2. The notion of "Successive Phases"
  3. The theory of 2-dimensional Time.
  4. The Specious Present
B. PRECOGNITION
  1. Professor Ducasse's "Theory Theta"
    1. Inter-relations of Physical Events
    2. Inter-relations of Experiences
    3. Relations of Experiences to Physical Events
  2. Professor Flew's Comments
    1. The Epistemological Objection
    2. The Causal Objection
    3. The Fatalistic Objection
(VII) The Psychophysical Individual
A. THE SELF AND SELF-KNOWLEDGE ACCORDING TO MCTAGGART
B. EPIPHENOMENALISM
C. THE "COMPOUND" THEORY
(VIII) Sense-perception and Matter
A. Professor Price's Paper
  1. Range of Application of the "Act-Object" Analysis
  2. "Appearing so-and-so" and the "Sensum Theory"
B. Professor Marc-Wogau's Paper
  1. Argument from Continuity
  2. Argument from the finite velocity of light
C. Professor Yolton's Paper
  1. "Phenomenalism," "Phenomenalistic Realism," and "Dualistic Realism"
  2. "Ontological Construction"
  3. The "phenomenalistic" and the "dualist" strands
(IX) Moral Philosophy.
A. PROFESSOR FRANKENA'S QUESTIONS.
B. MORAL PHILOSOPHY AND MORAL PRACTICE
C. "OUGHT" AND "CAN"
D. THE EXISTENTIAL ACCOUNT OF HUMAN PERSONALITY.
Conclusion