Dictionary of Philosophy

(Ancient - Medieval - Modern)

edited by

Dagobert D. Runes

(and 72 Authorities)


Φιλοφια Βιου Κυβερνητης

pdf file

Indexed in the Meta-Encyclopedia of Philosophy.

A| B| C| D| E| F| G| H| I| J| K| L| M| N| O| P| Q| R| S| T| U| V| W| X| Y| Z
Edited in hypertext by Andrew Chrucky, July 10, 2004.


The aim of this dictionary is to provide teachers, students and laymen interested in philosophy with clear, concise, and correct definitions and descriptions of the philosophical terms, throughout the range of philosophic thought. In the volume are represented all the branches as well as schools of ancient, medieval, and modern philosophy. In any such conspectus, it is increasingly recognized that the Oriental philosophies must be accorded ample space beside those of the western world.

The great field that must be compressed within the limits of a small volume makes omissions inevitable. If any topics, or phases of a subject, deserve space not here accorded them, it may be possible in future editions to allow them room; I take this occasion to invite suggestions and criticism, to that end.

Clarity and correctness would be more easily secured if there were concord among philosophers. Scarcely any two thinkers would define philosophy alike; nor are they likely to agree as to the significance of its basic concepts. The value of a one-volume dictionary, nonetheless, makes the effort worthwhile.

"Dictionaries are like watches," Samuel Johnson said; "the best cannot be expected to go quite true, but the worst is better than none."

I trust that the present volume will serve as reliably as the chronometer of today, in the time-pattern of the philosophic world.

I owe a debt of profound appreciation to every one of the many collaborators that have so generously contributed to the Dictionary. Especially do I wish to acknowledge my gratitude to Professors William Marias Malisoff and Ledger Wood. Needless to say, the final responsibility, as to the general plan of the volume, together with the burden of any shortcomings, rests solely upon the editor.


AS.—Anglo Saxon
q.v.—quod vide ("see also")